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25 July 2013 What is the PPH implementation workshop? USAID’s flagship Maternal and Child Health Integrated Program (MCHIP), with partners Population Services International (PSI), Venture Strategies Innovations (VSI), and EngenderHealth, will offer a three-day workshop for non-governmental organizations and implementing partners. The workshop will focus predominantly on implementation approaches for preventing PPH at homebirth using misoprostol. It will also provide partners with the knowledge and tools for successful implementation of a comprehensive approach to PPH prevention using strategies for births either at home or in a facility.
23 July 2013 Today, the Lesotho News Agency published a piece on Apex—a private clinic that MCHIP is supporting to perform voluntary medical male circumcisions.
23 July 2013 Two editions of the Guinea Ministry of Health newsletter include extensive coverage of the Standards-Based Management and Recognition (SBM-R ®) ceremonies that took place at several MCHIP-supported facilities. In addition to a description of the events, there are separate articles that include interviews with providers on their experiences with the project and process.
22 July 2013 By Lepheana P Mosooane Ever thought that doing circumcision and an HIV test means going to where angels fear to tread? Indeed, I remember missing exactly three appointments for voluntary male circumcision last year due to inevitable circumstances. Little did I know that history would repeat itself this year.
19 July 2013 The Frontline Health Workers Coalition published a piece on Lesotho’s commitment to decreasing HIV transmission, including MCHIP efforts in the country to promote and provide Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision services.
19 July 2013 DHAKA, Bangladesh—Aponjon, a mobile-based health information service, is rapidly gaining popularity across the country. And today, with the registration of its 100,000th client, an important milestone was reached in the program’s evolution and expansion. Aimed at expectant mothers and those with children below one year of age, Aponjon is accessible to anyone with a mobile phone bearing a Grameenphone, Robi, Airtel, Citycell or Banglalink connection. By dialing “16227” and registering for the service, users can begin receiving pertinent health information and advice for both mothers and infants. These messages are sent throughout pregnancy and until a child’s first birthday.
17 July 2013 By Joel Suzi Thyolo, Malawi—When the outreach roadshow advertising free male circumcision services arrived in the village of Helimani, Kizito Liyasi was curious enough to attend an information session. A grocer with a wife and baby boy, Kizito was moved by a man’s personal decision to be circumcised as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent the spread of HIV. He headed home to discuss the free health service with his wife.
17 July 2013 Since 2009, MCHIP has worked in Kenya at the national level with the Department of Family Health to provide technical assistance and program support. To view a video on MCHIP’s work in the country—which spans efforts in nutrition, child health, family planning and HIV—click here.
12 July 2013 Grand Bassa County, Liberia—In the past, if a woman of reproductive age in Grand Bassa County was interested in learning more about her family planning (FP) choices, the only option was to travel to the health facility and wait for hours to see the health care provider. Most Liberian women are too busy supporting their families to take the time to receive counseling on FP methods even though they may be interested.  According to the latest Demographic Health Survey (LDHS 2007), the contraceptive unmet need in Liberia is 36%, with a total fertility rate of 5.2. Moreover, the maternal mortality rate is 994/100,000—one of the highest in the world.
2 July 2013 In a piece entitled "Making Childbirth Safer," the Million Moms Challenge reveals the dangers of pregnancy and birth in many parts of the world. To read the piece, which includes mention of MCHIP's work in sub-Saharan Africa, click here.
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