Postpartum family planning (PPFP)

This analysis is based on the 2011 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data from Ethiopia. It summarizes key findings related to birth and pregnancy spacing, fertility return, unmet need for and use of family planning (FP), and contact with key services for women during the period from the last birth through two years postpartum.
This analysis is based on the 2008 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data from the Philippines. It summarizes key findings related to birth and pregnancy spacing, fertility return, unmet need for and use of family planning (FP), and contact with key services for women during the period from the last birth through two years postpartum.
26 September 2013 We sometimes struggle to explain why women in the postpartum deserve special attention, and why health workers, including community health workers, must seek every opportunity to speak to these women about the benefits of contraception. We’re hoping a new way of presenting Demographic and Health Surveys data helps to clarify why this is so important.
WHAT: Please join MCHIP and the Postpartum Family Planning (PPFP) Community of Practice for a global online discussion forum exploring monitoring and evaluation of postpartum family planning integrated programming. The discussion will focus on determining the benefits of integrated PPFP programming, evaluating the influence of integration, and interpreting and reporting results.
31 August 2013 Dr. Lennybeth Latido and Nurse Teodora Rhodora are championing postpartum family planning (PPFP) services at Batangas Regional Hospital in the Philippines. Knowing that birth intervals of less than 36 months are associated with higher maternal, newborn and child morbidity and mortality and increased child under-nutrition, they have been training their colleagues in delivering a long-term but reversible contraceptive method to  women—the postpartum intrauterine contraceptive devices (PPIUD).
MCHIP and Population Services International’s (PSI) Support for International Family Planning Organization (SIFPO) program, with funding from USAID, convened a regional meeting in Africa to bring together international and regional experts together to advance integration of postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device (PPIUCD) services into maternal health services. A total of 59 participants from 10 countries actively engaged in South-to-South learning, sharing successes and challenges based on their country experiences.
15 August 2013 Jeolikote, India—Monica Ravi lives in a small village in the hilly state of Uttarakhand. Like most women in her community, her day begins early. After working through the morning in the small family owned field on the mountain side, she goes home to her household chores. Her husband is a tourist car driver and is gone for days at a stretch, leaving Monica to manage their affairs, including looking after his parents and their one-year-old daughter, Angel.
This analysis is based on the 2006-07 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data from Pakistan. It summarizes key findings related to birth and pregnancy spacing, fertility return, unmet need for and use of family planning, and contact with key services for women during the period from the last birth through two years postpartum.
This analysis is based on the 2010 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data from Rwanda. It summarizes key findings related to birth and pregnancy spacing, fertility return, unmet need for and use of family planning, and contact with key services for women during the period from the last birth through two years postpartum.
11 July 2013 One billion of the world’s population is comprised of youths—those aged 15 to 24—of which half are young women. In all, 85% live in developing countries, with the largest proportion in Asia. In Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean, youth account for more than 15% of the population. In the younger subset specifically, there are 260 million girls aged 15 to 19 living in these areas.[1] As we mark World Population Day this July 11th, let us remember their unique needs for reproductive and sexual health education and services.
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