Senegal

16 January 2013 Last fall, Senegal became the ninth country in the “meningitis belt” (a band of 26 countries stretching from Senegal to Ethiopia) to introduce the effective, low-cost MenAfriVac™ vaccine through the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP), a partnership between the World Health Organization (WHO) and MCHIP partner PATH. In countries where the vaccine has been introduced, a profound impact has been seen on reported meningitis cases, with no cases reported among those who were vaccinated and with dramatically reduced bacterial carriage—even among those too old to have been vaccinated.
By identifying the successes and best practices of the Senegal program, by recognizing its weaknesses in order to correct and prevent them, and by having a clear vision of the future of the program, this summary report on the Senegal iCCM experience (Integrated Community Case Management of Childhood Illness: Documentation of Best Practices and Bottlenecks to Program Implementation) has a two-fold aim: 1) to serve as a global learning tool that can help other countries adapt their own iCCM efforts, and 2) to continue to inform program implementation in Senegal.
11 November 2012 Pneumonia is the deadliest disease among children under the age of five, killing an estimated 1.4 million children annually. Today on World Pneumonia Day, we not only recognize the burden of this disease, but we at MCHIP also celebrate the fact that pneumonia is preventable and that safe, effective and affordable tools are helping to avert and treat the disease. The Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV) can protect susceptible children against severe forms of pneumococcal diseases—mainly pneumonia, meningitis, bacteraemia and sepsis—and MCHIP is assisting countries in introducing this lifesaving vaccine in high mortality countries.
6 November 2012 Meningitis is a less popular topic on the global health scene, but for those living in the region spreading from Senegal to Ethiopia—dubbed the “meningitis belt”—it remains a major public health concern. Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, the lining that protects the precious brain and spinal cord, and without treatment can lead to death or result in serious long-term consequences such as deafness, epilepsy and mental retardation.
Aimed at stakeholders in Senegal, this case study was created in response to a USAID Mission in Senegal request to MCHIP to describe the process of scaling up key evidence-based interventions to improve maternal and newborn survival over the preceding five years, and key associated results of these efforts.
By identifying the successes and best practices of the Senegal program, by recognizing its weaknesses to correct and prevent them, and by having a clear vision of the future of the program, this report has a two-fold aim: 1) to serve as a global learning tool that helps other countries that are looking for ideas to accelerate and expand their own iCCM efforts, and 2) to continue to inform program implementation in Senegal.
MCHIP conducted program reviews of malaria in pregnancy (MIP) programming successes and challenges in Zambia, Senegal and Malawi, which resulted in three comprehensive country case studies. In addition, MCHIP developed a three-country analysis brief linking the results, recommendations and next steps across the three case studies, available below in English and French. For the individual case study documents, visit the Documentation and Dissemination page.
MCHIP conducted a program review of malaria in pregnancy (MIP) programming successes and challenges in Senegal, which resulted in a comprehensive country case study. The purpose of the case study was to gain a better understanding of MIP programming efforts, specifically:
What: Please join CORE Group and MCHIP for a webinar on Integrated Community Case Management of Childhood Illness Experiences in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi and Senegal   Who: Presentation by Dr. Serge Raharison, MCHIP's Child Health Technical Officer When: January 24th from 10:30 am -11:30 am
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